Sagrantino di Montefalco, a challenger to Barolo | Britt on Forbes

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There are many more exciting high-quality wine districts than the handfull of world famous names. One wine to discover is certainly Sagrantino di Montefalco.

Montefalco is in Umbria, just south of Tuscany. In some ways it is similar to Tuscany, for example it is just as beautiful, and there’s also a lot of Sangiovese here.

One thing that is differnt though is that in Montefalco you can find the Sagrantion grape. It makes dense, powerful and very structured wines. Perhaps it is even a challenger to the famous Barolos and Barbarescos made from Nebiolo.

In Britt’s latest article on Forbes, Why The Next Wine In Your Wine Cellar Should Be A Sagrantino Di Montefalco, she gives you some recommendation for a few outstanding producers of Sagrantino di Montefalco.

View over Montefalco landscape
View over Montefalco landscape, copyright BKWine Photography

Here’s the introduction:

Umbria is a beautiful part of Italy. I already hear your comments, most of Italy is beautiful. This is true. So if I add that Umbria also has some stunning wines? OK, so does a lot of other Italian regions. But still, Umbria has some very rare wines indeed.

Umbria is a small region but with distinct differences in wine styles. In the south of Umbria, vineyards are scattered around the pretty town of Montefalco. As in the more famous neighbour to the north, Tuscany, Sangiovese is grown here and used for the wine Montefalco Rosso. Many of these wines are very pleasant and affordable. Great food wine, light and elegant in style.

However the big surprise comes from the Sagrantino grape. This grape is used for only a small part of the production in Montefalco. But the wines are stunning. There is as much complexity and ageing potential that you can ask for. Some people compare it with Barolo from Piedmont, others with that great grape of southern Italy, Aglianico.

Read Britt’s full article on Forbes: Why The Next Wine In Your Wine Cellar Should Be A Sagrantino Di Montefalco.

Strada del Vino de Montefalco del Sagrantino
Strada del Vino de Montefalco del Sagrantino, copyright BKWine Photography
Valentino Valentini of Bocale
Valentino Valentini of Bocale, copyright BKWine Photography
Carapace Tenuta Castelbuono
Carapace Tenuta Castelbuono, copyright BKWine Photography
Consorzio Vini di Montefalco
Consorzio Vini di Montefalco, copyright BKWine Photography
Marco Caprai of Arnaldo Caprai
Marco Caprai of Arnaldo Caprai, copyright BKWine Photography
Bocale Montefalco Sagrantino
Bocale Montefalco Sagrantino, copyright BKWine Photography
Alessandro Lunelli of Tenuta Castelbuono
Alessandro Lunelli of Tenuta Castelbuono, copyright BKWine Photography
Perticaia Montefalco Sagrantino
Perticaia Montefalco Sagrantino, copyright BKWine Photography
Peter Heilborn of Tenuta Bellafonte
Peter Heilborn of Tenuta Bellafonte, copyright BKWine Photography
Devis Romanelli
Devis Romanelli, copyright BKWine Photography

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